Conga

One of the big hangouts in Gochang is the local coffee shop, Conga. The owners are super cool and lots of fun. The wife, Dongha, speaks really good English. She’s a lot of fun too. The husband, Kongsup, has international ambitions and likes to travel to Europe. His love for coffee has taken him to many places, most recently Italy. They provide a small amount of sophistication and relaxation in a very rural, very Korean town. 

The shop itself boasts many art pieces and sculptures as well as living plants. The front of the shop is covered in windows and fills the cafe with light.  

They have a roaster and roast their own coffee beans. They make some delightful drinks too. I usually get an iced Americano but their kiwi or grapefruit juice is killer. 

   
   

IMuseum

Dongdaemun shopping district has always captured my imagination and after three years only yesterday would I say that I had a good time in the area. Most of my trips have been relegated to wondering around feeling really lost while looking for sewing materials. This trip was really different. My son and I went to the Iplay Museum in the Dongdaemun Design Park. It was so cool. I found out about it on A MultiAsian Family Life. I love Kids cafés and want to go to more of them. This was the perfect opportunity. It was 14,000 won. I think we were there for an hour, maybe more. You get a free drink as an adult. They had drip coffee and honey. I had to buy a juice box of milk because that’s how I drink my coffee with milk.


It’s a kids cafe that has all wooden structures. There was a big pit with big wooden balls and a slide. I went on the slide but the baby was super nervous. There are tons of play zones including dress-up, mechanic, race track. There is a large wall with items that have blinking buttons when pushed they make noises, like the toilet makes a flushing sound. I made the baby do everything. I had so much fun. There was a good amount of people there. We were the first but then a group of Seoul foreigners showed up. I love being reminded that other people have children, too. I’m not the only one!


 Near the bathrooms there is a lactation room. I asked a staff member for a nursing room and she It’s huge. We hung out in there for a while too. There are three private nursing spaces. It was really nice to get some undistracted feeding in while traveling. We had a blast. I highly reccom


First shot

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Adventure starts here . . .

  • Teach English to K- adult_talkm_oWnLsIf8nB_MUyZZCqSsFqkdFGEtx6kdK_i_u5xdgwesm2zm (1)
  • Be immersed in Korean culture
  • Have fun with songs, art and games
  • Relaxed work environment 2pm-10pm
  • Go home early if there is no class
  • Less than three minute walk to school
  • Receive competitive benefits and salary
  • Located in Gochang, South Korea

Employment Package

  • Competitive salary 2.1-2.3 million KRW
  • Average 6 hour teaching day
  • Paid vacations and national holidays off
  • Small-sized classes – 7 students
  • Fully furnished single housing
  • Airfare one-way/ round trip
  • Year completion bonus
  • Health care and National pension

Requirements

  • Be a citizen of the US, UK, Canada, or Australia
  • One year commitment60382_591626030354_1254451275_n
  • A. from an accredited college
  • No criminal record
  • Adventurous Spirit

 

Apply now!

 

Send your cover letter, picture, resume and questions addressed to Lindsy Moran at zesgochang[at]gmail.com by April 2016.

 

Pantry capsule

So  I’m a little behind the trend or maybe I’m just learning about whats going on in the world outside of Korea. This past weekend I’ve been learning all about capsule wardrobes. It’s a very cool fashion idea which poses the thought that you can look amazing with a minimal amount of clothes cluttering your life. I’ve been a long time believer that I ‘should’ spend more money on fewer clothes to make my life better. Korea has really helped me cull my collection to a few pants and a couple shirts. I keep trying to throw away my jacket but every time I put it next to the door it snows. Come on, Winter, shove over for Spring already.

Perhaps the biggest point of contention in my house is the tiny kitchen. If you haven’t guessed it already, I’m working on a pantry capsule. I want to have things in the kitchen I use 95% of the time. I think this will mean sticking to my convictions when I go shopping. It means having a focused effort on using up the last bits of precious foreign items and working with Korean ingredients. I have a pretty good outline of what this looks like.

I feel like the spice/ tea area is my big down fall. Confession, I don’t really drink tea. As for the spices what I use feels like a small portion of what’s there. The spices I use on the regular are purchased from the local grocer. I use salt, pepper, cinnamon, Korean red gochu pepper, garlic powder, parsley, basil, sesame oil, sesame seeds, fish sauce, soy sauce, white vinegar, spaghetti sauce, corn syrup. Other cooking essentials are flour, rice, baking powder, baking soda, panko crumbs, corn starch, sugar, brown sugar, onions, canola oil, and olive oil. I think I can pair this down even more by taking out the spaghetti sauce and corn syrup. In my Korean fridge, you will always find kimchi, eggs, soy bean paste, spicy soy bean paste, milk, ground pork, lemon, minced garlic. We often have a variety of vegetables and one kind of fruit.

This is not what my kitchen looks like today but I hope it will be here soon. I’m also working to have fewer pots and pans. It feels like a big task but I think it will happen.

photo 2

Fried octopus sandwich

A long time goal of mine mostly due to being in Korea is to master seafood, namely octopus, squid, and cuttlefish. I didn’t gather up courage or even think about what was happening when Wyll picked up octopus at the market today. He likes to push me into my goals. It was a good price and I was wanting to try a Tom Colicchio recipe for a calamari sandwich. I ended up with something probably really different but terribly delicious. This recipe was so good I felt obligated to share it right away. There were a few prep things I had to do like learn to clean and cut baby octopus. Luckily YouTube is full of wonderful people doing amazing things so I figured it out kinda quick. Basically you cut off the tentacles, push out the beak and cut into sections. Then slice the head so you can turn it inside out to pull off the brain sack then cut it off at the eyes. It took four before I felt really comfortable doing it. I ringed them off and set them in a colander to dry off a little. Then I went to work on the green peppers. I pan fried them whole with fish sauce and garlic. I mixed up some panko crumbs, corn starch, salt, pepper, garlic powder, and gochu powder. I mixed in all the octopus trying to get an even coat. I heated some oil in the wok and covered the bottom with octoparts! I let them cook to pop songs then put them on paper towels to dry. I didn’t really have much for Colicchio’s sandwich just an idea about how good it would be. I did have Saracha which I mixed with some lemon. Sorry, Tom, no mayonnaise. I sliced up tomato, very thin, diced onion, chopped up some curly parsley, and got out some radish sprouts for the sandwich. I assembled my sandwiches on some French bread, delicious. 

  

Japan

It seems that in all my pages, the Japan trip never made it to print. In the first year that Wyll and I lived in Korea our first summer vacation was spent in Japan, enjoy the Hells of Fukuoka. Wylliam had a college friend that lived in the county so we visited him and he toured us around. We went to Nagasaki together and saw the A-Bomb museum which is not for the faint of heart. There is also a Dutch colony there for people to tour around. We did some amazing Karaoke which is still brought up when singing in public of listening to Weird Al.

The pictures don’t seem to have much rhyme or reason, much like the streets. Japan focuses on building names so we got lost a lot, even though I eventually figured it out.