Long awaited holiday

After a year of anticipation I finally celebrated Christmas with my brother and sisters. A week before the 25th as no one wanted to wait any longer and many of us have other family obligations. It was perfect.
We did a secret Santa to ensure that even the naughty received a gift. Fortunately no coal was passed out. So we must have been pretty good as a group. Wyll and I got the opportunity to give out our Korea gifts and that was a lot of fun. I think everyone ignored the secret Santa idea and got gifts for everyone. It was extra jubilant.
We ate traditional foods like ham mash potatoes. There was persimmon pancakes for breakfast and then I made a vegan persimmon bread for the following day.
I had so much fun. I love spending time with the family. The next trip should be a lot of fun a few kits were handed out. So the next visit will involve sushi making!

Making Kimchi

How can I describe the emotions surrounding  making kimchi?

When I was trying to convince Wyll that Korea was the place to be we watched Anthony Bourdain’s No Reservation. Bourdain gets a whorl wind tour of the country. At one point he meets up with some older women who are making Kimchi. They do NOT let him touch it. He waits, watches sadly and tells viewers what is happening. Watching the show I thought how sad for him. Kimchi is a process unlike most other fermenting cabbage dishes, hello fish! It could easily be the mascot of Korea. As it is a source of pride and eaten with EVERY meal, I can understand why they wouldn’t want to eat his poorly seasoned cabbage everyday for months. Then again I wished that I would have the opportunity to watch artisans make kimchi.

I knew before we came that November was kimchi month, prime cabbage harvesting time. At Y-mart down the street, the cabbages are displayed on pallets. Walking to work, truck beds piled high with cabbage drive past us. I have also noticed the arrival of very cute plastic food grade tubs with snap on lids and handles. Grace claims few cooking skills. I talked with her about kimchi season. She said her aunts do that sort of thing, when she was vacationing in Korea they sent her some. I knew that Sam and Mr. No (our off-site directors) were involved with farms. They had both brought us huge persimmons. One day I sneak attacked them. I stopped at work to drop off some things for later. They were there cleaning- how embarrassing! I think we were all surprised. I mean what was I doing there!?! Trying to smooth over the situation Mr. No and I were talking about farming and he invited us out to make Kimchi! I was like jumping off the walls. V is for VICTORY!

I was ecstatic. Rather impatiently, I waited. Toward the end of November I was beginning to feel like maybe it wasn’t going to happen. One day Grace would look up from her desk and say ‘No-can-dos-ville babydoll’. Then at least I would know. On Monday (Dec.3) Grace hung up her phone and said ‘it’s getting so cold- I hope we don’t have to make Kimchi’. I thought Oh, no here it comes. It was like she knew it was coming. Mr. No set the date for Friday. We would have to go in the morning and it would be outside. The way Grace talked about it we would be watching. Then we would eat and go to work. I was a little disappointed, but at least I would be outside at a farm surrounded by happy people making a ton of kimchi.

Wyll and I got ready according to Graces description. If we weren’t going to be getting dirty then we should dress nice. Dress to impress. Wyll (the smart one) wore jeans and a button up. I wore several layers, slacks, two new sweaters and went with my heeled boots. We headed put into the mini blizzard that put other areas on snow alert. Grace met us at the call taxi luckily moments before the driver had taken us to the bus terminal. (Being two of the 14 foreigners we are easily recognized- many times Grace has called ahead so the locals know what we are about.) The taxi driver didn’t want to take us all the way to the house. You can’t blame him really. The roads had snow and horrifying ditches on either side.

When we arrived we were taken past two dwindling pallets of salted and cleaned cabbages into the house and given gloves.

“What!?! Oh yes!”

Mr. No explained that we can’t have lunch and a bucket of Kimchi for nothing. This is a community event. This is the third and easiest day. If we are only here for a short time other people will get upset.

Oh man, AND we get to take some home! Too bad we were wearing such silly outfits. We walk into the green house where everyone is set up working in groups of three. I can tell that the expectations are low, we were given a much smaller bowl and pile of cabbage. However, this was a good move on their part. Mr. No’s brother comes over to give us a visual how to. I sit on my legs. Grace laughs and says I’ll be sitting for a loooong time. So I play around with some other way to sit. Mr. No’s brother brings me a Styrofoam cushion to sit on. This proves to be very difficult with the height of my shoes.

So I’m rubbing the red paste into my cabbage leaves. Each leaf is done individually and you have to make sure to get all the creases and folded parts even the very bottom. Mr. No’s mom comes by and tells us to make sure to get the diakon and onion in there. She tells us to taste it. The salt flavor will mellow and the pepper flavor will be the same. Then she sneaks some large chunks of diakon into our bucket. Wyll didn’t notice. 😛

Wyll and I are unsure how to taste the paste. (Well remember the lady hand feeding us at the farmers market, it seems that Koreans are unafraid of germs). I grabbed a diakon piece and chowed down. This is the fresh version of Kimchi. The cabbage is crunchy and you can taste the complex flavors in the red paste. There is no shellfish in it at this point. It was so freaking good. Grace is chowing away and really slathering the paste onto the cabbage leaves. Mr. No’s mom comes back and says we shouldn’t put on so much- why do one cabbage when you can do two?

Wyll and I fill up our bucket like pros. Grace’s bucket is full. They set them aside and bring over new ones. We passed the test so we get to make kimchi for other people! Let’s finish the radio flyer of cabbage!

When we first walked into the house we briefly met Mr. No’s sister. She is the family cook, head chief, also a professor. As we begin to assemble kimchi for relatives who could not make it, this stemmed pork is placed in front of us. Mr. No’s mom say wait I’ll get you kimchi. The smaller fresh leaves are put next to the pork. She then rolls the pork in the leaf and hand feeds Wyll. He tries to bite it in half. No she sternly tells him in Korean that he has to eat the whole thing. In one bite. Grace laughs as she translates then Mr. No’s mom feeds her too. She was a little surprised. So, I’m ready, but my mouth is small. I have to look at the ceiling to keep all the food in my mouth. Wyll tells Grace about how I look like a chipmunk when I eat. We laugh and eat the best food in the world. Mr. No is very excited to give us the best makgeolli he could find. He tells us a story abut how he had to try every kind at the supermarket. I think he had a lot of fun doing that. Then Sam came by and gave me soda! Thank you, SAM! Makgeolli is a Korean unfiltered wine. It was good with the food, but on it’s own it reminds me of banana peels (this is between you and me).

Before our dish was finished we were brought out more food. Grace and I gorged. It was the first time I had a home cooked Korean meal. Grace kept talking about how expensive it would be in a restaurant. I just kept thinking so freaking good, I may have danced a little in my squatting position. When we finished our extra cabbages (these were packaged with a plain leaf on top so they would know it was made by beginners), we headed inside for a little clean up. I think all three of us had red paste on our pants and arms. We cleaned up in the bathroom. Grace told us about the importance of finding a good man in Korea. Mostly it surrounds his mother.

Does he participate in kimchi making?

Will I have to make kimchi?

These answers are like a double edge sword. You want a man who will make kimchi instead of watching soccer. (GOAL!) You want a mother-in-law who will work with you, not steam roll you.

Mr. No comes in. I point at some crazy looking pickled ginseng…? Wyll and Mr. No think I am pointing at a picture of Mr. No’s son. The wall behind the TV is covered in family photographs. There are several recent ones a few older ones, there is one of Mr. No in his 20’s during his time in the Korean Military. Every man has a mandatory 2 years in the Army. They do not look forward to it. There are two large family portraits the women are all wearing hanboks (the traditional Korean outfits). As Mr. No heads back outside his sister sets up a table and lays out more food for us, fish soup and ten different side dishes. Everything tasted so wonderful.She is an amazing chef. I raved so hard we were invited back for lunar new year!!!!!!!  There was an acorn tofu jello thing, dried menos, cold sesame spinach, pepper soy sprouts, raw oysters, rice and of course kimchi. I can’t remember everything….

Formal Intros

Today was pretty exciting at school. We finally did formal introductions for the students. Wyll and I made PowerPoints to show all the students. We had to keep it educational so I created a crossword and Wyll made a fill in the blank. We shared all the classes today so it was very busy. Grace is eager to have us bond with the students so she gave us a lot of time. We ended up going over for every class. Which meant that we eat a lot of yogurt and bananas. I think I ate four bananas today.

I am the lead teacher for the first two classes of the day. These are younger grades and one on one classes. I started my PP and had them fill out the crossword as I went. I think most students were very excited to hear Wyll’s favorite American music. There was even a lot of exclamations of ‘how pretty’ when mothers and sisters were on the screen. Students seemed to understand the basic ideas we were throwing at them. Keeping it simple and easy to understand was probably the hardest part of the preparation.

The youngest students didn’t even notice our multiple parents or seemingly very different looking siblings. For the older students it was hard to understand our family (as one adult student called it a ‘morning drama’- like a soap opera). Also the direct translation for step parent has bad connotations (think snow white’s step parent). Younger students were apprehensive to even say step parent out loud in Korean.  I found a direct translation and had a student read it out loud to the class. The eyes in the room were as big as saucers. A better word is ‘new parent’ which has flaws as well.

The older students wanted to know everything. They had so many questions we went over by 20 min. What a blast!

Mad Crazy life experiences

Friday we officially started to apply for our visa. We also found out our luggage was never sent. 😦 Hopefully it arrived Saturday so we an have it for our Southern California/ Nevada trip. Yesterday we also had our going away party. It was tons of fun. It was a smallish space for a pool party, everyone who came had a good time. We had a potluck and a potlatch (where you give away your stuff).

We also announced our engagement. (Unknown words and expressions!!!) Wyll and I are getting MARRIED!

I am super excited to visit my grandparents and tell them in person. Then we are headed to LA to hang out with Wyll’s grandma and then Tahoe to see Wyll’s grandpa. 26 hours of driving and one week left before departure. Ending in Ukiah to give my mom the car then maybe getting a ride into the bay area or taking the bus. The plan at this point is to stay with Parents until the flight then to bart to sfo. The strange thing is that we don’t actually have our tickets. They will come. It will be amazing.

Right now I’m enjoying the company of my family. Camilo is eating pizza, mom and I are gabbing away about life and change. Thea is upstairs preparing for a day of adventure. I think everyone had a great and wonderful time last night. Both my mom and Thea were excited to meet Wyll’s friends (Kevin the Slam Poet was a big hit). Mom is still lit; talking about Paula and what an amazing woman she is. I see so much of my mom in Paula. So happy that all the kids got to hang out- Mack, Theo, Cayden, Camilo running around, getting into trouble and being best friends forever. Thea and Zoey got to hang out, bonding over Dr. Who. It was just so much dangy fun.

I figure in six to nine months Wyll and I will have a plan about Korea. Will we be there for a second year? Will we be moving back to the State? Will we move to the east coast for school or work? At this point there are so many possibilities. It’s hard to make any kinds of plans about the future. Wyll and I are on an adventure together, right now that’s more than enough. ❤

15 days to the First

We are trying to hard to get everything together to leave before the first of October. We are still waiting for our apostilled degrees which should arrive any day. By that I mean a few days ago. Luckily we splurged and apostilled our criminal background checks through a private company so they are back already. It could have taken an additional ten business days. That may not sound like much but this is becoming a race against time. We have inventoried all of our belongings. That took some time. We are also close to completing our shopping list. Some friends have helped us purge and couch surf. The traveling has already begun. We spent a few nights at the Lemmer Lodge and will be seeing my sister soon. Next week might also bring with it a trip to Southern California, a visit to the Korean Consulate, a final hurrah at a friends house and a flight to Korea! Its all moving so fast like a blur!